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He casts his eye over Emma and imagines she will be easily seduced. He invites her to go riding with him for the sake of her health. Charles, solicitous for his wife's health and not at all suspicious, embraces the plan.


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Emma and Rodolphe begin an affair. She, consumed by her romantic fantasy, risks compromising herself with indiscreet letters and visits to her lover. After four years, she insists they run away together. Rodolphe does not share her enthusiasm for this plan and on the eve of their planned departure, he ends the relationship with an apologetic, self-effacing letter placed at the bottom of a basket of apricots he has delivered to Emma. The shock is so great that Emma falls deathly ill and briefly turns to religion.

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When Emma is nearly fully recovered, she and Charles attend the opera , at Charles' insistence, in nearby Rouen. They begin an affair. Emma indulges her fancy for luxury goods with purchases made on credit from the crafty merchant Lheureux, who arranges for her to obtain power of attorney over Charles' estate. Emma's debt steadily mounts. In despair, she swallows arsenic and dies an agonizing death.

Charles, heartbroken, abandons himself to grief, preserves Emma's room as a shrine, and adopts her attitudes and tastes to keep her memory alive. In his last months, he stops working and lives by selling off his possessions. His remaining possessions are seized to pay off Lheureux. He dies, and his young daughter Berthe is placed with her grandmother, who soon dies. Berthe then lives with an impoverished aunt, who sends her to work in a cotton mill.

The book concludes with the local pharmacist Homais, who had competed with Charles's medical practice, gaining prominence among Yonville people and being rewarded for his medical achievements. Emma Bovary is the novel's eponymous protagonist Charles's mother and his former wife are also referred to as Madame Bovary, while their daughter remains Mademoiselle Bovary. She has a highly romanticized view of the world and craves beauty, wealth, passion, as well as high society. It is the disparity between these romantic ideals and the realities of her country life that drive most of the novel, leading her into two affairs and to accrue an insurmountable amount of debt that eventually leads to her suicide.

She lives a life of the mind, and it is her introspection and analysis of her internal conflicts that marks the psychological growth of Flaubert as an author. Charles Bovary , Emma's husband, is a very simple and common man. He is a country doctor by profession but is, as in everything else, not very good at it.

Yet he is a healthy man who enjoys his work, riding about to attend to patients. He is outgoing and friendly, with a gift for remembering names and faces, and he is mostly called upon to perform first aid. Charles adores his wife and finds her faultless, despite obvious evidence to the contrary. He never suspects her affairs and gives her complete control over his finances, thereby securing his own ruin. Despite Charles's complete devotion to Emma, she despises him as she finds him the epitome of all that is dull and common.

Rodolphe Boulanger is a wealthy local man who seduces Emma as one more in a long string of mistresses. Though occasionally charmed by Emma, Rodolphe feels little true emotion towards her. As Emma becomes more and more desperate, Rodolphe loses interest and worries about her lack of caution.

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After his decision to escape with Emma, he resigns and feels unable to handle it, especially the existence of her daughter, Berthe. He leaves Yonville when he despairs of Emma reciprocating his feelings, however the two reconnect after Emma's affair with Rodolphe Boulanger collapses. They begin an affair, which is Emma's second. Monsieur Lheureux is a manipulative and sly merchant who continually convinces people in Yonville to buy goods on credit and borrow money from him.

Having led many small businesspeople into financial ruin to support his business ambitions, Lheureux lends money to Charles and plays Emma masterfully, leading the Bovarys so far into debt as to cause their financial ruin and Emma's suicide. Monsieur Homais is the town pharmacist. He is vehemently anti-clerical and practices medicine without a license.

Though he pretends to befriend Charles, he actively undermines Charles's medical practice by luring away his patients and by setting Charles up to attempt a difficult surgery, which fails and destroys Charles's professional credibility in Yonville. Justin is Monsieur Homais' apprentice and second cousin. He had been taken into the house on charity and was useful at the same time as a servant. He harbors a crush on Emma. At one point he steals the key to the medical supply room, and Emma tricks him into opening a container of arsenic so she can "kill some rats keeping her awake". She, however, consumes the arsenic herself, much to his horror and remorse.

The setting of the novel is important, first as it applies to Flaubert's realist style and social commentary, and, second, as it relates to the protagonist, Emma. Francis Steegmuller estimated that the novel begins in October and ends in August This corresponds with the July Monarchy — the reign of Louis Philippe I , who strolled Paris carrying his own umbrella as if to honor an ascendant bourgeois middle class. Much of the time and effort that Flaubert spends detailing the customs of the rural French people shows them aping an urban, emergent middle class.

Flaubert strove for an accurate depiction of common life. The account of a county fair in Yonville displays this and dramatizes it by showing the fair in real time counterpoised with a simultaneous intimate interaction behind a window overlooking the fair. Flaubert knew the regional setting, the place of his birth and youth, in and around the city of Rouen in Normandy. His faithfulness to the mundane elements of country life has garnered the book its reputation as the beginning of the movement known as literary realism.

Flaubert's capture of the commonplace in his setting contrasts with the yearnings of his protagonist. The practicalities of common life foil Emma's romantic fantasies. Flaubert uses this juxtaposition to reflect both setting and character.

Ezra Miller Madame Bovary

Emma becomes more capricious and ludicrous in the light of everyday reality. Yet her yearnings magnify the self-important banality of the local people. Emma, though impractical, and with her provincial education lacking and unformed, still reflects a hopefulness regarding beauty and greatness that seems absent in the bourgeois class. The book was in some ways inspired by the life of a schoolfriend of the author who became a doctor.

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Flaubert's friend and mentor, Louis Bouilhet , had suggested to him that this might be a suitably "down-to earth" subject for a novel and that Flaubert should attempt to write in a "natural way," without digressions. While writing the novel, he wrote that it would be "a book about nothing, a book dependent on nothing external, which would be held together by the internal strength of its style," [3] an aim which, for the critic Jean Rousset , made Flaubert "the first in date of the non-figurative novelists," such as James Joyce and Virginia Woolf.

The "realism" in the novel was to prove an important element in the trial for obscenity: the lead prosecutor argued that not only was the novel immoral, but that realism in literature was also an offence against art and decency. The realist movement was, in part, a reaction against romanticism. Blame books for that! They make us crave something better. They make us question everything! They addle our brains and leave us unmoored in a confusing world. Poor Emma.


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It was translated by Lydia Davis. At that time she worshipped Mary Stuart and felt an ardent veneration for illustrious or ill-fated women. I detest common heroes and moderate feelings, the sort that exist in real life.

Scenes from a provincial life

The project did not seem an easy one. The good lady took it upon herself: on her way through Rouen, she would go in person to the proprietor of the lending library and inform him that Emma was terminating her subscription. She herself was in some way becoming an actual part of those imaginings and was fulfilling the long daydream of her youth, by seeing herself as this type of amorous woman she had so envied. She was not happy and never had been. Why was life so inadequate, why did the things she depended on turn immediately to dust?

Madame Bovary and Catastrophism: Revolving narratives

A man, at least, is free; he can explore every passion, every land, overcome obstacles, taste the most distant pleasures. But a woman is continually thwarted. Inert and pliant at the same time, she must struggle against both the softness of her flesh and subjection to the law.

Her will, like the veil tied to her hat by a string, flutters with every breeze; there is always some desire luring her on, some convention holding her back.